Tip #763: Why You Are Neotenic

“I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious.”  Albert Einstein

I just read this article about “Why Are So We Curious?”by Tom Stafford. Rather than attempting to paraphrase, let me quote the salient parts that explain why we are neotenic- and why that’s a good thing.

“Evolution made us the ultimate learning machines and the ultimate learning machines need to be oiled by curiosity.

… We humans have a deeply curious nature, and more often than not it is about the minor tittle-tattle in our lives. Our curiosity has us doing utterly unproductive things like reading news about people we will never meet, learning topics we will never have use for, or exploring places we will never come back to. We just love to know the answers to things, even if there’s no obvious benefit.

… The roots of our peculiar curiosity can be linked to a trait of the human species call neoteny. This is a term from evolutionary theory that means the “retention of juvenile characteristics”. It means that as a species we are more child-like than other mammals. Being relatively hairless is one physical example. A large brain relative to body size is another. Our lifelong curiosity and playfulness is a behavioural characteristic of neoteny.

Neoteny is a short-cut taken by evolution – a route that brings about a whole bundle of changes in one go, rather than selecting for them one by one. Evolution, by making us a more juvenile species, has made us weaker than our primate cousins, but it has also given us our child’s curiosity, our capacity to learn and our deep sense of attachment to each other.

And of course the lifelong capacity to learn is the reason why neoteny has worked so well for our species. Our extended childhood means we can absorb so much more from our environment, including our shared culture. Even in adulthood we can pick up new ways of doing things and new ways of thinking, allowing us to adapt to new circumstances.

Curiosity is nature’s built-in exploration bonus. We’re evolved to leave the beaten track, to try things out, to get distracted and generally look like we’re wasting time. Maybe we are wasting time today, but the learning algorithms in our brain know that something we learnt by chance  today will come in useful tomorrow.”

Why Are Humans So Curious?” is another article that further explains the different types of curiosity we have from a neurological standpoint and how curiosity first developed to protect us.

Isn’t this wonderful? I just had to share it!

May your learning be sweet.

Deborah

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