Tip #759: Lindquist’s Model of Engagement- Part One

white businessman and

“Create caring and robust connections between every employee and their work, customers, leaders, managers, and the organization to achieve results that matter to everyone in this sentence.” –David Zinger

Rusty Lindquist is the founder and CEO of Life Engineering. A few years ago, he created a model of employee engagement that enumerated 16 essentials. The following list and explanations are drawn from “16 building blocks that bolster employee engagement,” by Lauren Stead. Here are the first eight essentials. The remaining eight essentials will be covered in Tip #760.

  1. Objective– knowing where you’re going and why you should care about it.
    People need to know where they’re going. Otherwise, they’ll be aimless and lack motivation to keep going forward, simply spinning their wheels in place. Rusty explained that if you were just set at the top of a mountain and left to roam, you would accomplish far less than the person who’s put at the base and has the summit pointed out to them as the goal. Make sure managers are sharing what the company’s mission and objectives are with their teams, to keep everyone working toward that summit.

 

  1. Alignment– capability to do work and succeed at it.
    Managers need to find the sweet spot between the three factors that make up an employee’s alignment: competency, opportunity, and passion. In other words, employees need to actually be able to do what’s set before them, have the chance to move forward afterward, and enjoy what they’re doing. If something is off with these three factors, chances are the employees will be under-performing.

 

  1. Plan– knowing what the next step is or how to move forward on your career path.
    People need to know what to do next and have a clear picture of a path they can follow. They can be sold on their objective and feel comfortable in the company, but managers need to make sure there’s no confusion on how to achieve that objective. Break down future goals into achievable steps.

 

  1. Space– having what you need to move forward.
    Get out of employees’ way so they can create and accomplish personal goals. Space can mean having autonomy, ownership, permission, trust, influence, or just the right tools.

 

  1. Contribution– getting things done and feeling like you’re making a difference.
    People need to feel that what they’re doing is making a difference. The moment someone feels that they don’t matter, they begin to under-perform. If someone isn’t contributing, it’s a good time to evaluate the other engagement elements to see if something is out of alignment.

 

  1. Score– keeping score of your contributive value.
    Progress and impact need to be measured in some way. If a sense of progress is removed, people tend to contribute less value overall. Rusty compared it to playing a game with yourself. There’s no sense of accomplishment or context if you’re just racking up points by yourself.

 

  1. Momentum– having a sense of moving forward and inevitability.
    Momentum may drop when a project is completed or canceled. Before a new project starts up to take the old one’s place, there’s a time where there’s no momentum. While periodic breaks are good, make sure managers are keeping employees focused on the overall summit.

 

  1. Investment– feeling like you have skin in the game.
    This is a factor you can notice outside of the workplace. For example, consider a stamp incentive program at coffee shops. Each time you visit, you’re given a stamp and when you achieve a certain number you’re given a reward. These types of programs instill in you a sense of investment, that you’ve potentially lost out on if you quit now. This is the same sort of feeling employees need to feel from their managers.

Which are most important to you?

How does your company compare?

May your learning be sweet.

Deborah

Related Posts

Manage Your Holiday Stress Before It Manages You!

Saturday, December 10th from 11 AM to 2:30 PM CST

Over the river to grandmother’s house- we have an idea in our mind about how the holiday should be. But planning, shopping, baking, wrapping gifts, and preparing the house all take a toll. It’s easy to become anxious, worried about creating a perfect, memorable holiday. It doesn’t matter if it’s Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, or some other winter holiday. There are traditions to keep, favorite foods to prepare, and decorations to put up. It’s exhausting.

Then there’s the actual day. You will want everyone to feel happy and get along, but you know that the stress of the day can easily result in overexcited and grumpy grandchildren and irritable adult children. You imagine that all the time and effort you put into creating a lovely day could end up being wasted and unappreciated.

Holidays are supposed to be a joyful time. Let us help you get clear about what is not worth worrying about- and give you practical coping strategies that will help you stay calm when things don’t go the way you want them to go.

Join us for this highly interactive half-day virtual workshop on how to Manage Your Holiday Stress Before It Manages You on Saturday, December 10th from 11 AM to 2:30 PM CST. Your investment is $120. We guarantee that you will have a much less stressful holiday.

It doesn’t have to be difficult to Deal with Difficult People.

In this course you will define the behavioral characteristics and underlying needs of difficult people, assess situations in which you effectively handled a difficult person, review five steps for handling difficult people Laurel & Associates now offers courses through Teachable. Learn at your own pace.
Popular Post

Share This Post